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Thread: EBR Racing front rotor install instructions

  1. #1
    Senior Member Cooter's Avatar
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    I had a couple questions about my EBR Racing front rotor install and found some vague and incorrect answers on here (and BadWeb), so I thought I'd post the answers that EBR gave me in case someone is searching. I'd like BuellXB.com to be the source for the best info, but I'm biased a bit:D

    Which way do I mount my EBR rotor?
    "The 6mm rotor requires the step to be facing outside, the 5mm rotor doesn't matter"

    Whats the torque spec for the EBR rotor hardware?
    Recommended rotor bolt hardware torque WAS 25-27ft/lbs. It was UPDATED to 16-18 Ft/lbs!!

    What order do I put the EBR hardware on?
    Heres a screenshot of the pdf they sent which shows proper hardware install order and torque.


    And a close up of the hardware:


    Bolt head, concave side of washer to bolt head, square rotor insert (see proper direction), copper washer, and sleeve…

    What about the not-so-square thing?
    Like this:


    6-bolt torque order. First, snug all bolts then:

  2. #2
    Senior Member Cooter's Avatar
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    My personal recommendation is NEW pads and that means you MUST bed them in properly.

    Here is one of the best explanations of WHY:


    "Pad and Rotor Bed-In Theory, Definitions and Procedures
    Removing the Mystery from Brake Pad Bed-In
    by Matt Weiss of StopTech and James Walker, Jr. of scR motorsports

    In order for any brake system to work optimally, the rotors and pads must be properly bedded-in, period. This process can also be called break-in, conditioning, or burnishing, but whatever terminology you choose, getting the brakes properly bedded-in and keeping them that way is critical to the peak performance of the entire brake system.
    However, understanding why the rotors and pads need to be bedded-in is just as important as the actual process. If one understands what is happening during the bed-in process, they can tailor the process to specific pads, rotors, and/or driving conditions. For this reason, we present this generic bed-in overview pertaining to all brake systems, but follow with links to application-specific bed-in procedures to fit most every set of circumstances.

    What is brake pad “bed-in” anyway?

    Simply stated, bed-in is the process of depositing an even layer of brake pad material, or transfer layer, on the rubbing surface of the rotor disc. That's it. End of discussion. Ok, not really, but although bed-in is quite basic in definition, achieving this condition in practice can be quite a challenge, and the ramifications of improper or incomplete bed-in can be quite a-a-n-n-o-o-y-y-i-i-n-n-g-g.

    Abrasive friction and adherent friction

    There are two basic types of brake pad friction mechanisms: abrasive friction and adherent friction . In general, all pads display a bit of each, with abrasive mechanisms dominating the lower temperature ranges while adherent mechanisms come more into play as pad temperature increases. Both mechanisms allow for friction or the conversion of Kinetic energy to Thermal energy, which is the function of a brake system, by the breaking of molecular bonds in vastly different ways.
    The abrasive mechanism generates friction or energy conversion by the mechanical rubbing of the brake pad material directly on the rotor disc. In a crystalline sense, the weaker of the bonds in the two different materials is broken. This obviously results in mechanical wear of both the pad and the rotor. Consequently, both pads and rotors are replaced when they are physically worn to their limit and are too thin to endure further service.
    The adherent mechanism is altogether different. In an adherent system, a thin layer of brake pad material actually transfers and sticks (adheres) on to the rotor face. The layer of pad material, once evenly established on the rotor, is what actually rubs on the brake pad. The bonds that are broken, for the conversion of Kinetic to Thermal energy, are formed instantaneously before being broken again. It is this brake pad-on-transferred brake pad material interaction on a molecular level that yields the conversion process.
    With the adherent mechanism there is much reduced rotor wear as compared to abrasive mechanism, but it's not a free lunch – pads now become the primary wear element in the braking system. And even though rotors are not mechanically worn down with adherent systems, they still will need to be replaced on a regular basis due to cracking reaching a point of failure if they are exposed to intense, repetitive thermal cycling. This is why race teams throw out rotors that are actually as thick or thicker than when they were brand new. It's due to the an adherent brake pad transfer layer!

    The all-important transfer layer

    As stated above, the objective of the bed-in process is to deposit an even layer of brake pad material, or transfer layer , on the rubbing surface of the rotor disc. Note the emphasis on the word even, as uneven pad deposits on the rotor face are the number one, and almost exclusive cause of brake judder or vibration.
    Let's say that again, just so there is no misunderstanding. Uneven pad deposits on the rotor face are the number one, and almost exclusive cause of brake judder or vibration. (NOT rotor warpage!!) Ed.
    It only takes a small amount of thickness variation, or TV, in the transfer layer (we're only talking a few ten thousandths of an inch here) to initiate brake vibration. While the impact of an uneven transfer layer is almost imperceptible at first, as the pad starts riding the high and low spots, more and more TV will be naturally generated until the vibration is much more evident. With prolonged exposure, the high spots can become hot spots and can actually change the metallurgy of the rotor in those areas, creating “hard” spots in the rotor face that are virtually impossible to remove.

    Bedding fundamentals

    In general, bed-in consists of heating a brake system to its adherent temperature to allow the formation of a transfer layer. The brake system is then allowed to cool without coming to rest, resulting in an even transfer layer deposition around the rotor circumference. This procedure is typically repeated two or three times in order to ensure that the entire rotor face is evenly covered with brake pad material. Sounds easy, right? Well, it can be if you have the proper information.
    Because the adherent temperature range for brake pads varies widely (typically 100°F-600°F for street pads and 600°F-1400°F for race pads), each bed-in needs to be application-specific. One could try to generate a one-size-fits-all procedure, but too little heat during bed-in keeps the material from transferring to the rotor face while overheating the system can generate uneven pad deposits due to the material breaking down and splotching (that's a technical term) on to the rotor face.

    In summary, the key to a successful bed-in is to bring the pads up to their adherent operating temperature in a controlled manner and keep them there long enough to start the pad material transfer process. Different brake system designs, pad types, and driving conditions require different procedures to successfully accomplish the bed-in. The recommended procedures below should provide you with the information you need to select the bed-in procedure appropriate for your application."

  3. #3
    Senior Member Cooter's Avatar
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    That article was from here:
    Pad bed in explanation

    Ok if you got this far now you know WHY, but your asking WHAT is the procedure to bed in new pads.

    Like stated above that depends on the actual pads you bought and what you're using them for. So defer to the manufacturers recommendation for you pads. NOTE: Most brake pad companies make lots of different pads and may offer a 'universal' answer, so be careful.

    After exhaustive research, I have found 2 basic groups of instructions. Race and street. If your racing, do what your race brake specialist says and ignore me totally:)

    Street/Urban riding with street/urban pads (brake pads that meant to be used UNDER 600ºF).

    The whole point of this procedure is to gradually heat up the pads (but not over-heat them), and transfer some material EVENLY to the rotor face. Then COOL the brakes so the material takes a "set". As stated above, if this isn't done (or not done properly) it can act like a warped rotor and even ruin the rotor and pads.

    With cold brakes, find a long, empty, stretch of road with no lights or cross streets. (Ya, right.)
    From 30mph, brake to 5mph, three times without stopping.
    Then from 50mph, brake to 5mph, slightly harder, three times without stopping.
    Then from 70mph, brake to 5mph, even more quickly (but not a 'panic stop') three times without stopping.
    Now, ride for 5 miles without using the front brake and park it overnight. The cooling off period is important for even distribution of pad material.


    If at any time you are getting brake smoke or brake fade, calm down! Let them cool off and start again with much less braking force than you are using.

    Personally, I use a laser thermometer while I'm riding to check the temps as I'm bedding pads, but I'm an idiot and couldn't recommend anyone do that. Ever.

  4. #4
    Senior Member heagachongoose's Avatar
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    Great info here cooter. Just stumbled on this looking for torque values on the ebr rotor.


  5. #5
    Senior Member Cooter's Avatar
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    Thanks! I'm working on a couple other of the basics, but dang! The hardest part is doublechecking all the sources:/
    I wouldn't want to put something on the Internet that wasn't true!









    And I have a huge knob.

  6. #6
    Senior Member mrlogix's Avatar
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    Nice write up cooter. With references. Oh yeah , huge is subjective. Lol.

  7. #7
    Senior Member Cooter's Avatar
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    I do have references for that, at least! The wife has very small hands....

  8. #8
    Senior Member mrlogix's Avatar
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    The wife has very small hands....

    that is why I like midget porn. You realize how big it looks in those chubby little hands.

  9. #9
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    Nice find different from any thing I have seen

  10. #10
    Senior Member Cooter's Avatar
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    Thanks guys. I compiled a huge amount of info, double-checked the sources, then removed everything not pertinent to get the most concise, easy to understand process.

    I hope it helps!



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