Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 11 to 19 of 19

Thread: H-D front fork oil (Type E)

  1. #11
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    May 2020
    Location
    North Texas
    Posts
    163
    Great you've convinced me to use bar and chain oil.

  2. #12
    Senior Member Cooter's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Location
    Crawling up your skirt
    Posts
    9,155
    The only reason to change the weight of your fork oil is if you are outside of the adjustment range. i.e. your compression or rebound is maxed out to get the performance you want, and any that level you need new springs first.

  3. #13
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    May 2020
    Location
    North Texas
    Posts
    163
    Quote Originally Posted by Cooter View Post
    The only reason to change the weight of your fork oil is if you are outside of the adjustment range. i.e. your compression or rebound is maxed out to get the performance you want, and any that level you need new springs first.
    Word. Thanks man. I do know that viscosity does break down in fork oil over it's life, so you're always chasing damping as time progresses (and as heat increases in the forks). I guess I was batting the idea around of going heavier to avoid it but I think I'll be fine with the stock 10w/Type E.

  4. #14
    Senior Member 34nineteen's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Location
    lunatic_fringe is ___________ my spirit animal
    Posts
    3,318
    I’m in Phoenix, and it gets hot here also, but I’d recommend sticking with the stock stuff.

    Like CoOter mentioned, there are reasons to move away from the stock oil, but unless you’re having damping issues or are pushing the bike hard enough cause it to “overheat” I’d stick with it. If for nothing else than to get a baseline for how it reacts toward your riding style. Old oil will react with the dampers (not dampeners CoOter!) differently than fresh oil so changing the weight due to the old oil feeling bad isn’t exactly apples to apples.

    Plus from what I understand, different brands weight rating can differ from other brands of the same weight. Plus, what weight is Type E really? I’ve never been able to get a straight answer. Ask 10 people and get 10 different answers.

    If I was racing, I’d go to an aftermarket brand, so I could track my oil weight and get somewhat consistent results. If HD Type E is 10wt, is it the same viscosity when they switch between Maxima, Bel-ray, etc.

    The short answer is that I agree with CoOter, but I’m trying to not make it obvious that I am.
    Last edited by 34nineteen; 04-15-2021 at 06:49 PM.

  5. #15
    Senior Member 34nineteen's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Location
    lunatic_fringe is ___________ my spirit animal
    Posts
    3,318
    Quote Originally Posted by kz6fittycent View Post
    Great you've convinced me to use bar and chain oil.
    Bar and shield oil. Lol

  6. #16
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    May 2020
    Location
    North Texas
    Posts
    163
    Quote Originally Posted by 34nineteen View Post
    I’m in Phoenix, and it gets hot here also, but I’d recommend sticking with the stock stuff.

    Like CoOter mentioned, there are reasons to move away from the stock oil, but unless you’re having damping issues or are pushing the bike hard enough cause it to “overheat” I’d stick with it. If for nothing else than to get a baseline for how it reacts toward your riding style. Old oil will react with the dampers (not dampeners CoOter!) differently than fresh oil so changing the weight due to the old oil feeling bad isn’t exactly apples to apples.

    Plus from what I understand, different brands weight rating can differ from other brands of the same weight. Plus, what weight is Type E really? I’ve never been able to get a straight answer. Ask 10 people and get answers.

    If I was racing, I’d go to an aftermarket brand, so I could track my oil weight and get somewhat consistent results. If HD Type is 10wt, is it the same viscosity when they switch between Maxima, Bel-ray, etc.

    The short answer is that I agree with CoOter, but I’m trying to not make it obvious that I am.
    HA!

    Yeah I looked and just came to my own conclusion that it was 10w. I seem to remember that Bel-Ray is a little more viscous than other brands, and I've had success with their products. I've also used Motul, which was great, too.

    Spectro has "Type E" but I've never used it, so hard to say whether it's good. Decisions, decisions.

  7. #17
    Senior Member Cooter's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Location
    Crawling up your skirt
    Posts
    9,155
    I wouldn't obsess over fork oil weight. Even fresh 5w compared to fresh 10w is easily adjusted to the same sized person with OE suspension settings and will behave the same. You only need to change it up if you have any of your adjustments MAXED out.

    Quote Originally Posted by 34nineteen View Post
    Plus from what I understand, different brands weight rating can differ from other brands of the same weight. Plus, what weight is Type E really? I’ve never been able to get a straight answer. Ask 10 people and get answers.
    Totally this.

    Viscosity doesn't really 'break down with age', more like it gets more sensitive to heat*. Thinning out faster at a lower temp, making you fight to chase suspension settings.
    Turn your screws people! With the bike warm, first set sag, then set compression to the most travel without bottoming (zip-tie trick), then just enough re-bound to stop any bounce. It is easy, fast, and gets you to 98% for a comfortable ride and the best performance. Do it every 1000 miles or if you're going to change your riding style dramatically.

    *terrible oversimplification

  8. #18
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    May 2020
    Location
    North Texas
    Posts
    163
    Quote Originally Posted by Cooter View Post
    I wouldn't obsess over fork oil weight. Even fresh 5w compared to fresh 10w is easily adjusted to the same sized person with OE suspension settings and will behave the same. You only need to change it up if you have any of your adjustments MAXED out.



    Totally this.

    Viscosity doesn't really 'break down with age', more like it gets more sensitive to heat*. Thinning out faster at a lower temp, making you fight to chase suspension settings.
    Turn your screws people! With the bike warm, first set sag, then set compression to the most travel without bottoming (zip-tie trick), then just enough re-bound to stop any bounce. It is easy, fast, and gets you to 98% for a comfortable ride and the best performance. Do it every 1000 miles or if you're going to change your riding style dramatically.

    *terrible oversimplification
    Dave Moss.

  9. #19
    Senior Member Cooter's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Location
    Crawling up your skirt
    Posts
    9,155
    That guy (Dave Moss) is a tire reading Warlock! Good taste in bikes too He does such a good job of explaining the basics of set-up in simple terms Although I don't own a subscription, I would HIGHLY recommend paying someone that smart (and patient) for the knowledge that they can share



Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •