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Thread: 1190 RX/SX Fork Oil Level

  1. #1
    Senior Member konarider94's Avatar
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    1190 RX/SX Fork Oil Level

    Looking through the manuals I couldn't find the fork oil amount or level so I emailed tech@ebr. Thought I would share in case anyone still searches for things.

    540cc of Showa SS19 5W or 80mm if you prefer to measure by level instead of volume.
    Last edited by konarider94; 09-13-2017 at 08:20 PM.

  2. #2
    Senior Member midway's Avatar
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    Thank you, I need to purchase and top off after a fixed weep with a seal mate tool on one fork but I was not sure what oil was in the Showa currently. SAE5W is what you put right?
    Last edited by midway; 09-13-2017 at 05:09 PM.

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    Senior Member lunaticfringe's Avatar
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    ^^^ all showa cartridge forks call for 10w rob.

  4. #4
    Senior Member konarider94's Avatar
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    You have to use fork oil, not just a SAE5W. The SS19 is actually a specific fork oil from Showa. You can find it at most dirtbike/powersport stores. You could probably use any 5W fork oil such as belray or maxima, whatever your local powersport store has on hand.

    Lunatic I think you might be confused a bit. 10W is very heavy for a fork. The EBR parts/service, owners manual, and tech contact at EBR say to use the SHOWA SS19 fork oil. Im using the Pro Honda HP Fork Oil SS19 in mine. All the honda dirtbikes come with showa with a few years exception which I think is why its easy to find it with Honda on the bottle.
    https://www.rockymountainatvmc.com/p...Fork-Oil-SS-19


  5. #5
    Senior Member MakingPAIN's Avatar
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    I have been running a 5w amsoil shock therapy in my dirtbikes for years. Seems like EBR likes amsoil in their bikes, I am just gonna do some research and see what they make for spec showa forks and use that when it's time

  6. #6
    Senior Member Cooter's Avatar
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    Couple of points to think about:

    Volume is a much more consistent and accurate measurement.

    Fork oil weight shouldn't be dictated by the mfg, it's dictated by how much load the bike is carrying and how hard it's ridden. Nice to know that they put 5w in there, but if you have the adjustments maxed out either way, change the weight.

  7. #7
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    The most accurate measuring is weight, so I would measure how many grams go in the fork with scale.

  8. #8
    Senior Member Cooter's Avatar
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    On planet Aspergers you are correct.

    On this planet (where I live), you need to deal with inconsistencies.
    The reason total oil volume in a fork leg is the most accurate way to re-build forks is that it negates the unknown quantity of oil left in it. Different time allowed for draining, different cleaning procedures, more or less attention to detail all will affect how much oil or oil film is left.

    Just my opinion. You can count fork oil molecules if you wish, this method works the best for me

  9. #9
    Senior Member MakingPAIN's Avatar
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  10. #10
    Senior Member konarider94's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cooter View Post
    Couple of points to think about:

    Volume is a much more consistent and accurate measurement.

    Fork oil weight shouldn't be dictated by the mfg, it's dictated by how much load the bike is carrying and how hard it's ridden. Nice to know that they put 5w in there, but if you have the adjustments maxed out either way, change the weight.
    This is clearly meant to detail what the fork comes with from the factory, honestly don't care what you want to do outside of that. So yes it is important to know what oil it came with. If someone is happy with their suspension and throws 10w in there after a rebuild thinking that's what they had all along its going to be a problem for them.

    You can also raise and lower the oil level to change the progressiveness but this isnt a suspension tuning guide. I'm just trying to relay information that wasn't included in the manual because we will all need to know the starting point even if you choose to deviate from it.

    Measuring the level after assembly takes into consideration any oil that may have been left in the damper assembly. The only time I add based on volume only is with dual chamber forks where it isn't possible to measure the oil level.



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