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Thread: Buelltooth Mufflers

  1. #1
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    Buelltooth Mufflers

    I've searched for reviews and/or opinions of the Buelltooth mufflers. I've seen a couple folks have the supertrapp style and like them OK. Does anyone have the XB-SS or XB-SG? They are "stainless steel" so someone put some effort into them. Good, bad or indifferent?

    https://www.buelltooth.com/exhaust.html.
    Last edited by The Bob; 04-01-2019 at 01:01 PM.

  2. #2
    Senior Member Cooter's Avatar
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    Yes they are 100% stainless. I have the Supertrapp style on my STT and really really like it a lot.
    Very easy install and cheap!

  3. #3
    Hey Cooter. Saw from older posts that you had a Drummer previously. I'd appreciate your comments on the Drummer vs. Buelltooth as i am considering both. Thanks.

  4. #4
    Senior Member Cooter's Avatar
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    My Drummer was the stock can/aluminum end cap style and I did like it a lot! Kevin is the man

    It would be quieter than the Buelltooth Supertrapp style and maybe a little deeper when full of packing. I didn't like the bulk down there (or the maintenance) but I wouldn't hesitate to recommend one

  5. #5
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    Im looking at this Buelltooth muffler and it's so cool looking but, I have a hard time thinking about putting a muffler on, that I can't jack the bike up on, am the only one ?

  6. #6
    Senior Member Chicknstripn's Avatar
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    Njloco, how often do you jack your bike up? If you have a rear wheel stand the ability to jack the bike up by the muffler really isn’t that important.
    I don’t think I’ve ever jacked my bike up from the muffler. I always use a rear wheel stand to maintenance.
    Just a thought.

  7. #7
    Thanks Cooter. I like being able to jack the bike up on the muffler. Partly due to space arrangements in my garage but it makes it easier to work on suspension especially rear. Plus for winter storage you can take the weight off the suspension as well as the tires. There are other ways to do it like hang it from an A-frame ladder or ceiling but jacking is easy.

  8. #8
    Senior Member Cooter's Avatar
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    Like Chicken said, I have never needed to jack up the bike by the unstable round muffler for anything. I know you can nail together a homemade wood cradle thing, but even a cheap HF paddock stand makes a much more solid foundation to pull off the tire and hold the bike upright.

    This makes it even easier, if you don't trust the swingarm pads
    https://www.buellxb.com/forum/showth...t=cooter+makes

    Even riding the Cyclone M-2 (with Buelltooth muffler) and losing the front wheel bearings in you're-going-to-die-if-you-don't-fix-it Montana, I was able to easily but the jack up the front by the engine case, balanced on the kickstand to swap them out.

    *Importantly though, I don't believe you can use the jack points on the Drummer anyway? You'd have to ask Kevin, but theres no longer any support inside it, just a screen to wrap padding around. I don't know any aftermarket muffler you can jack it up on if that's your priority... you might be looking for a factory Buell "Race muffler".

  9. #9
    Senior Member Cooter's Avatar
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    IMO, I would suggest against the ol' wives tale of "taking the weight off the suspension". They certainly won't wear them out just sitting there. Monroe shocks used to quote that for every mile driven, the suspension cycles over a million times. Since a Buell with 100k on the clock can still have stock springs in it, statically sitting over winter won't kill them.

    The problem is when you 'take the weight off' and letting the suspension hang off the bike, you are exposing more of the shock shaft and fork legs. Even those hardened chrome surfaces that are now exposed can get tiny pits of rust and when you drop the bike back down they will cut into the dry shock and fork seals, prematurely wearing them for no reason at all.

    Every month, wander out to the garage and check on your baby. Check for rodents, wipe the shiny stuff with WD-40, check the lamp timer on the Battery Tender (never use 100% ON!), roll the tires 90*, and DON'T start it until you can RIDE IT up to operating temp. Gas and oil will be fine for up to 2 years, if you get to three years, sell it to someone who will ride it

    However, I would suggest storing the bike with the tires off the ground (front fork stand, and rear swingarm stand) or on a softer surface like wood. Over a winter won't matter, but if one winter turns to two or three or four


    TL;DR Cooter is preaching again

  10. #10
    Hey Cooter, thanks for the info.



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