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Thread: Rear Rotor Bolt Removal

  1. #1
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    Rear Rotor Bolt Removal

    I finally bought a rear rotor for my Uly. It failed the registration inspection cuz the rotor was too worn. I am having trouble removing the old rotor. Those torx bolts are not coming out easily. I am afraid to strip the torx head.

    Is there any special trick to get them busted loose? (hope to finish today)

  2. #2
    Senior Member Cooter's Avatar
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    Get the EXACT high quality torx socket bit on a 2 foot breaker bar that fits very well. Make sure it is seated all the way down, even a little tap with a little hammer, hold the socket square in the bolt and pull anti-clockwise while someones holding the rear brake on hard.

    Once the bolts are broken loose, remove the rear wheel and finish the job. IIRC the install torque specs are maybe 35ft/lbs (please check that yourself), but a lifetime of heat cycles will stick them in that alloy wheel pretty good.

    If you are careful with a map gas or propane torch, you can warm the area of the wheel and bolts. Don't blast it! Powdercoat gets damaged above 350*, loctite should melt at 175*.

  3. #3
    Senior Member Cooter's Avatar
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    I forgot to mention an impact driver with a torx socket, and a BFH, is your best friend for a job like that. Take the wheel off first, and don't miss!

    https://www.amazon.com/TEKTON-2905-8...85539586&psc=1

  4. #4
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    OK thanks Coot. I'll try giving it a little tap. Like they say, get a bigger hammer.
    I've tried the electric drill with the torque limiter (what ever it's called) that rattles when you reach the setting. I used to have one of those manual impact drivers but I've moved too many times.
    I guess it has had quite a few heat cycles since the rotor was worn way below spec. I didn't know people used the rear brake that much (but I do). I'll try tapping and I'll be back.

  5. #5
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    Whew! Did I mention that I just don't like crummy little bolts doing big jobs? I hate the notion of stripping the head - I've even stripped the head out of bodywork torx. Those stupid things cost six bucks each.

    Anyway, We got 'er done, the Cooter and me. Didn't strip a one. Like he said, beat on them and put a pipe on the end of your ratchet. Scared me but I'm thinking we're in business. Now if I can get it re-inspected and go fight with Mary Land bureaucracy of vehicular transportation and sport...

  6. #6
    Senior Member Chicknstripn's Avatar
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    Here’s a tip so you, or another member, doesn’t face the same fastener problems.
    Get a torque wrench.
    Follow the factory recommended torque specs. I usually set my fasteners somewhere in the middle ground of torque specs.
    Use medium strength lock tight.

    Only time I do not follow the above is with the body fasteners. Those I set a quarter turn pass hand tight with medium strength lock tight.

    When removing fasteners always use penetrating oil, like liquid wrench. If a torx or Phillips head is stripped I put a light sprinkling of comet(or some other type of gritty powder) in the suspect fastener head and a little water(usually spit!). This makes a gritty paste that adds friction when removing fastener. Toothpaste also works. Use steady, heavy force directly on to the head of the bolt/screw while turning said fastener.

    I hope those tips help anyone having a fastener crisis.

    And if worse comes to worse, a Dremel tool will turn any stripped bolt into a fastener that can be removed by a flat screw driver!

  7. #7
    Senior Member Cooter's Avatar
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    All great tips Chicken!
    I have a little tube of Valve Grinding Compound I use for exactly the same purpose and it works like magic!

    Ever tried to remove float bowl screws that some jack-hole used a regular phillips head instead of a JIS? A dab of VGC and she-bang! All good (most times....)

    Good job The Bob, on to the next hoop to jump through, lol.

  8. #8
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    Thanks for the tips- the both of you. I never thought of gritty friction enhancements.

    I do have a nice torque wrench and I use it. It scares me sometimes.

  9. #9
    Senior Member Silverrider's Avatar
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    C&C have great tips ^^^^^^ I can vouch for cheap tips will break off in the heads ,DAHIK.
    Last edited by Silverrider; 05-04-2019 at 09:58 PM.

  10. #10
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    Heat fastner with soldering iron to help release thread locker material



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