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Thread: Buell Schwinn Paramount - bicycle content

  1. #1
    Senior Member konarider94's Avatar
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    Buell Schwinn Paramount - bicycle content

    https://www.pinkbike.com/buysell/2602781/

    Check out this buell for sale. Not mine but I just found it looking for bike stuff near me. Would be cool to have with an old tuber.
    p4pb7033556.jpg

    Also here is a little article about the bikes on kneeslider
    https://thekneeslider.com/paramount-...ycle-for-sale/

  2. #2
    Senior Member Cooter's Avatar
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    Hey, thats pretty cool! I didn't know that bit of history, thanks for sharing Theres an 80's ski jacket in my closet that matches it, and I would get to say "NiceSASS" to annoy people

  3. #3
    Senior Member 34nineteen's Avatar
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    And if you owned a Bianchi SASS you could really get some props. Make sure to run it 32:16 not 34:19 like me.

    I actually switched to 32:18 awhile back. I was only running a 34 since my first singlespeed could run a 34:17 as a “magic gear”. After I broke that frame, I switched to 29” wheels and ran a 34:19 and after those gears wore out I switched to 32:18. Currently my single now has a 32:19 gear (Blackspire 32t - White Industries ENO 19t) cause I am weak sauce.

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    I gather this is bicycle talk, it's very interesting as well as foreign to me.

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    I'm guessing it has to do with the sprocket teeth ratio front to versus rear ?

  6. #6
    Senior Member konarider94's Avatar
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    The bianchi has no buell involvement though.

    I think that buell schwinn would be a cool display piece other than the price. It got a lot of people looking at the design when the rider seeded 52nd took 3rd. It definitely helped develop mtb technology.

  7. #7
    Senior Member Endopotential's Avatar
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    Being a fellow pedal biker, the one big flaw I could see with that design is that the shock is fully exposed in probably the most banged up portion of a mountain bike.

    If your front wheel goes over a log but don't completely clear it, next thing that hits would be the shock. Plus it's in the direct path of all the mud and stones kicked up from the front wheel.

    That's probably one of many reasons the shocks on all modern mtn bikes are shielded behind the downtube or seattube (aside from suspension design constraints).

    That purple frame just screams early '90s cool though

  8. #8
    Senior Member outthere's Avatar
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    They did make a few errors back then. We have 8 bikes here. Most of our stuffs a bit dated.
    Attached Images Attached Images
    Last edited by outthere; 02-25-2020 at 10:50 PM.

  9. #9
    Senior Member 34nineteen's Avatar
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    Actually just about every manufacturer did. MTB full suspension design was in its infancy back then (early 90’s) and it was like the Wild West, with more bad designs coming that seemed like a great idea in the moment.

    I had heard of the Buell/Schwinn bike, but never seen one. For some reason, i always thought it had a Lawwill rear end. This is just a high single pivot with a linkage driven shock, however flipped around. It almost seems like the design was based around the shock as if it was the primary feature. Pull shocks on MTB’s were a thing back then, but I can’t remember who used them?? GT? AMP Research? K2?

    I can imagine this bike was also the impetus for the Schwinn Homegrown (go Tomato!) series of bikes. I always liked the hardtail models myself. If you ever saw the old TV show Pacific Blue, they would occasionally have a Homegrown full suspension bike such as a 4 banger, or Straight Six. I forget the exact timeline. Waterford on the seat stays is a nod to Waterford Cycles which is an offshoot of Schwinn owned by another family member, which I think is still in operation. Schwinn also bought and sold Yeti (who was using Lawwill suspension) around this time and eventually went bankrupt and is now owned by the parent company who owns Cannondale and GT. That’s a quick and dirty version of the story.

    The Bianchi comment earlier was referring the the Bianchi SASS (shiny ass single speed) another truly notable bike. Bianchi made a whole slew of them with similar names such as the DISS, SISS, and PUSS (yes, it was pink, you dirty bird).

  10. #10
    Senior Member Endopotential's Avatar
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    Woah, 34:19 you are the hot schnizzle bike guru! You definitely know the history of mtn bike design well!

    I have an old Litespeed Tsali with the YBB link, which I still think is one of the best bikes ever made.



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