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Thread: What parts for tall bars please

  1. #11
    Senior Member Cooter's Avatar
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    Still looks great Did you go for a long ride yet? The difference was way better for my wrists.

  2. #12
    Quote Originally Posted by Cooter View Post
    Still looks great Did you go for a long ride yet? The difference was way better for my wrists.
    Did 250 miles on it yesterday. My arms and neck were 100% better. Loved it. Legs still a little cramped, might get some lower pegs at some point but LOVE the new bars and setup.

    Speaking if setup... I found the handling great but it seemed slightly confused on what it preferred in the corners. While changing out the bars I noticed the forks were moved up in the triple clamps about 1/8 inch. I decided to move them back. Then I grabbed the manual and reset ALL the suspension settings to the recommended settings for my weight. Having read these are sensitive to setup and coming from a off road background where suspension setup and bike setup are super important I wanted to start at a good base line. All the settings were off but by a small amount. Clicker here, little preload there. Also went with recommended tire pressure instead of forum recommended few pounds less. The result was nothing less the amazing. The bike is now one of the best if not the best handling bike I have ever ridden. I feel very integrated into the machine and it seems to read my mind. No need to think of the mechanics of making a turn you just kind of think where you want to go and it goes there. The suspension quality and frame rigidity conspire to make it a VERY stable and planted platform. I feel uber confident on it. Before it followed road irregularities some now it ignores everything. So good.

    Really gelling with this machine.

    20200409_122059.jpg

  3. #13
    OH, BTW a little pissed about the bar "KIT" I bought. First off the throttle cables were identical to stock, not longer!!! WTF? Made me swap out good throttle cables for the same throttle cables??? And that not necessarily an easy job. Irritating for sure. Also there were nice instructions about some mounting but nothing about mounting the throttle cables which is the most involved part. I have worked on a lot of bikes (been riding and wrenching for 40 years) so not a big deal but was a little pissed after spending the 2 hours to do it only to find out they are not different.

    Throttle cable install tip, zip tie the new cable to the old cable when you pull it out through the frame. Makes it so much easier to get it through there and in the right place. A lot going on in the small area between the frame and motor.

    Attachment 13171

  4. #14
    Senior Member Cooter's Avatar
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    Glad you like the bike! I find all Buells I've had to be super sensitive to front tires. Probably a victim of the extreme rake angle. They love to corner perfectly, then they start falling into corners and then have to catch it to stay up. Lame and scary. 30psi front/ 32psi rear
    Tire brands I've had doesn't change that, but I usually get a pretty soft compound. Q3+, Rosso III, etc.

    I was worried your bike already had the tall bar stuff on it! Oh well. At least you know you now have a complete CR tall bar conversion you could sell.

  5. #15
    Senior Member 34nineteen's Avatar
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    The 1125CR i had needed a tall bar kit. As I remember the cable were a little longer, but not by much. I’m surprised your didn’t mention having to modify a cable stop to get the new kit to fit. Maybe your bike already had the high bar kit on at some point and someone put low bars back on later.

    Routing the throttle cables wasn’t that tough, it just took a little care and perseverance to make sure they were wrapping around themselves as they were being run. The clutch hose was the tricky one for me.

  6. #16
    Quote Originally Posted by 34nineteen View Post
    The 1125CR i had needed a tall bar kit. As I remember the cable were a little longer, but not by much. I’m surprised your didn’t mention having to modify a cable stop to get the new kit to fit. Maybe your bike already had the high bar kit on at some point and someone put low bars back on later.

    Routing the throttle cables wasn’t that tough, it just took a little care and perseverance to make sure they were wrapping around themselves as they were being run. The clutch hose was the tricky one for me.
    Someone did have the high kit on. Not sure why you would go back? Already drilled for the screw on heated grips so made the install easier. There was wiring for driving lights so had to snake cable by that.

    so far:
    Added 647 miles
    Added bar end mirrors
    Took the passenger pegs off
    Removed the light kit and switches (cleaned it up a lot)
    Wired in the nice aftermarket CNC turn signals
    Reset the suspension to stock
    Reset the tire to stock pressure

    Bike is close to perfect for my needs now.

    Any solution for that front brake? I have yet to ride a Buell with a smooth front brake. I also ride a KTM 790r and 1290 duke some times and the brakes are so powerful and smooth. Like the power but its has a semi harsh feel. Rear brake sucks. Any fix for that? (same with my Uly)

  7. #17
    Senior Member Cooter's Avatar
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    For some reason that big Buell perimeter rotor is sensitive to friction material not evenly depositing as well as sticky rotor mounting hardware. EBC "HH" pad are great for the street, and it can be a very good brake. Honing the rotor and re-bedding the pads usually fixes a pulsing front brake, and I love the EBR mounting kit that eliminates the floating rotor and springs. It's available through EBR even though it says backordered.

    The stock Buell wooden rear brake feel can be totally eliminated by a rear master cylinder with a smaller (11mm IIRC) bore. Instead of just a hard, non-effective brake pedal you get a progressive rear brake that works!

  8. #18
    Quote Originally Posted by Cooter View Post
    The stock Buell wooden rear brake feel can be totally eliminated by a rear master cylinder with a smaller (11mm IIRC) bore. Instead of just a hard, non-effective brake pedal you get a progressive rear brake that works!
    Interesting. How do you do that?

  9. #19
    Senior Member Cooter's Avatar
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    Most rear motorcycle master cylinders mount the same. There may be some simple mods I'm sure you can handle, but just research the bore size. For some reason Duc Monster comes to mind? I forget the application now, but it wasn't hard to find.

  10. #20
    Quote Originally Posted by Cooter View Post
    Most rear motorcycle master cylinders mount the same. There may be some simple mods I'm sure you can handle, but just research the bore size. For some reason Duc Monster comes to mind? I forget the application now, but it wasn't hard to find.
    They do? This one seems like an odd ball. I'll look into it. Thanks.



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