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Thread: 2 consecutive bearing failures. I need help bad

  1. #31
    Senior Member Cooter's Avatar
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    Dude, RTFM. Even if you don't ever touch a tool, you can be informed and make decisions accordingly.

    I think outthere means the correct bearing installation tool, instead of the hammer your 'mechanic' is surely using to install and remove them. The picture and part number are in the Freaking Free Service Manual.
    Quote Originally Posted by Cooter View Post
    The only way I can imagine that the wheel hub is scratched (where the bearing outer race rides, is if someone uses a claw hammer, sticks, and rocks to change a bearing. NOT the sign of a professional, I should know

    Another sign of weak mechanic is repeated visits for the same problem on a simple (and fairly universal) part like a clutch.

    Sorry to say, he's probably a very nice and helpful guy, but your repeated issues aren't coming from the bike.

    Wanna fix this issue forever? Buy a NEW, COMPLETE, rear wheel. I have a new one complete with new bearings and spacers to sell you, or find them all over e-bay. Install by using the simple steps IN THE MANUAL.

    If thats too rich for your blood, and you still want to go to this guy...

    Watch him take the wheel off and remove the bearings. Stop him right there. Take close up pictures of both sides. Post them here and detail HOW he did it.
    Last edited by Cooter; 06-14-2020 at 04:54 PM.

  2. #32
    Quote Originally Posted by Cooter View Post
    Dude, RTFM. Even if you don't ever touch a tool, you can be informed and make decisions accordingly.

    I think outthere means the correct bearing installation tool, instead of the hammer your 'mechanic' is surely using to install and remove them. The picture and part number are in the Freaking Free Service Manual.

    The only way I can imagine that the wheel hub is scratched (where the bearing outer race rides, is if someone uses a claw hammer, sticks, and rocks to change a bearing. NOT the sign of a professional, I should know

    Another sign of weak mechanic is repeated visits for the same problem on a simple (and fairly universal) part like a clutch.

    Sorry to say, he's probably a very nice and helpful guy, but your repeated issues aren't coming from the bike.

    Wanna fix this issue forever? Buy a NEW, COMPLETE, rear wheel. I have a new one complete with new bearings and spacers to sell you, or find them all over e-bay. Install by using the simple steps IN THE MANUAL.

    If thats too rich for your blood, and you still want to go to this guy...

    Watch him take the wheel off and remove the bearings. Stop him right there. Take close up pictures of both sides. Post them here and detail HOW he did it.
    Thanks so much, i am not trying to be dense or defend my mechanic IF he was at fault. Im sure you can understand why maintaining relationships is important, having a mechanic for your car or bike or boat that youre on first name basis with is always great.

    I think youre right. Put the child gloves on and buy a new wheel for him. I think this is what my proposition should be to the mechanic.
    "I believe that theres no way to determine how to assign fault to these parts prematurely failing. However, considering we determined you overtorqued the rear end massively we should both take an L here instead of just me. I propose i purchase a complete new wheel, and you install it free of charge. This gives me peace of mind, and it will be easy and simple for you, practically the same effort as a tire change."
    I know i still lose money but it seems, for lack of better words, fair? Agree or disagree?

  3. #33
    The point i am making is there is a difference between him messing up a bearing as preventative maintenance, and him messing up a bearing after catastrophic failure. With the PM it can be undoubtedly proven the bike was fully functional before they touched it. In this case, there was a disastrous failure of the old bearing which COULD HAVE damaged something in the process, making the next bearing fail as well.

    At this point it probably is worth a new wheel just to have my trust back. No more hours sweating in illinois sunshine on the side of the road, no more fear of a crash. I can live with 180 more bucks if thats the end of this. Thanks for suggesting ebay, i checked st paul HD and they wanted 400+ for a wheel

  4. #34
    Senior Member outthere's Avatar
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    I buy wheels , new, e-bay for 250$. I've bought 3 rears and 3 fronts for 150, new, with bearings

  5. #35
    Senior Member outthere's Avatar
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    Theres a hero blue on there now 4 $165https://www.ebay.com/itm/NEW-BUELL-XB-1125-1125CR-TRANSLUCENT-HERO-REAR-WHEEL-G0309-02A8BYBX/133435806304?epid=1850240201&hash=item1f1164d260:gS4AAOSwOHBeTrOv
    Last edited by outthere; 06-14-2020 at 06:31 PM.

  6. #36
    Senior Member Cooter's Avatar
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    Ya someone is selling lots of new ones for 45% off right now. Time to stock up on all the colors! Haha.

    Buying a new wheel might be overkill, but you mentioned getting your trust back. For the bike and for the mechanic. Might be worth the cost. The install should be free, it's a 5 min job. RTFM yourself, and watch him do it. A good relationship with a mechanic you trust and give and take. Unless of course, he's a terrible mechanic. I'm not saying this guy is... Just keep your eyes open and see if he is costing you more than he's saving you.

    To be perfectly honest Scooter, some people are just new-bike-with-a-warranty people. Nothing to be ashamed of, but if you are this distraught over such a simple easy to fix problem, maybe look at a cheap but new bike? I drank the Buell-Aid a long time ago, but I can understand how a 10-20 year old motorcycle of any brand isn't for everyone.

  7. #37
    Quote Originally Posted by Cooter View Post
    Ya someone is selling lots of new ones for 45% off right now. Time to stock up on all the colors! Haha.

    Buying a new wheel might be overkill, but you mentioned getting your trust back. For the bike and for the mechanic. Might be worth the cost. The install should be free, it's a 5 min job. RTFM yourself, and watch him do it. A good relationship with a mechanic you trust and give and take. Unless of course, he's a terrible mechanic. I'm not saying this guy is... Just keep your eyes open and see if he is costing you more than he's saving you.

    To be perfectly honest Scooter, some people are just new-bike-with-a-warranty people. Nothing to be ashamed of, but if you are this distraught over such a simple easy to fix problem, maybe look at a cheap but new bike? I drank the Buell-Aid a long time ago, but I can understand how a 10-20 year old motorcycle of any brand isn't for everyone.

    Theres nobody i know thats more in love with buell than me. It was a home run the moment i first saw one. I am a diy guy, i service my bike and truck at home BUT.... anything involving wheels coming off i cant do. I dont have a stand or somethjng to hold the bike up. Im not a new-with-warranty type. My truck is 27 years old but reliable and costs me damn near nothing to operate -- like i said earlier, financial independence and all that.

    A wheel may be overkill but if that inner lip is damaged, and the mechanic has a history of boogering up wheel jobs, maybe spoonfeeding him (no offense) a new wheel with bearings is the best idea.

    Also, the clutch job i can actually vouch for him. We put in a kevlar clutch after the OEM failed at 13k miles. I wanted something stronger. Well after a few weeks it was dragging again. I took it in and it took him a couple weeks but what he ended up discovering is the little lip on the trans case where you fill the trans fluid through had broken, allowing the mechanism (forget what its called) that actuates the clutch to actually sit cockeyed when you pulled the clutch. This made it drag badly, and i had to order a new trans cover (300 bucks). He didnt charge me any labor for this repair. Fair or not, i left feeling satisfied with that compromise.

    In the end i think that because buells are so rare, most mechanics dont get enough experience with them, or they rely too heavily on a generic harley sportster FSM. most of my ownership has been mostly trouble free. Not quite "japanese" trouble free, but close enough to keep the bike for a good long while

  8. #38
    Senior Member 34nineteen's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by young scooter View Post
    Anyway, i am not sure what youre trying to say to me here
    Nothing. Good luck

  9. #39
    Senior Member GregoXB's Avatar
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    My advice, keep your Buell far away from that shop. God knows how he installed your clutch plates . ...

  10. #40
    the clutch has been fine ever since. This was last year.
    Like I said, mostly trouble free experience. I do any sort of electrical work if it needs it, do the tune ups at home. Most of my visits to the shop have been for new tires, and that one visit for the clutch. My hands are tied here, no one else in the county has a shop with the tools necessary to remove the buell wheels, or they straight up tell me they dont service buells.



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