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Thread: EBR master cylinder?

  1. #1
    Senior Member Cooter's Avatar
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    EBR master cylinder?

    Upgrading the brakes on the STT to all EBR stuff. Rotor/mounting kit and master.

    Both of these are supposed to be OE 1190 masters. Anyone know why the inlet is different? Color is different too, but the bore size is the same.
    964E2C0D-1EA9-4E34-8FAF-88452AE38872.jpg
    41D855E2-C330-473A-9CDD-6C18F83B6205.jpg

    Maybe an RX/SX thing?

  2. #2
    Member Barrett's Avatar
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    that's precisely it, shaughn. the m/c on the left in your top pic with black finish is the RX m/c.
    the one on the right is the SX m/c.

    they're both nissin sourced and pretty sexy.

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    Senior Member Disturbed1's Avatar
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    I have ordered Nissin components for several bikes over the years. Typically they only have three varriant colors. I don't know if it was a production thing, or they gave me a OE bike spec'd one off of a currnet production run, but one time when I ordered Black they sent me one similar to the color of the one on the right.

    Anyone know why the inlet is different?

    They both look to be Radial Types, just the one having the reservoir coming out the side is a newer version.
    (One on Right or lighter color. Which is all they manufacture now in a Radial.)

    "The vertically angled body lets the lever flow fluid directly through the master cylinder giving it a sharper response."

    At least that is what Nissin says in it's brochure... Follow the link to the two different styles.

    For refference.

    https://www.shindypro.com/brake_mckits.html
    Attached Images Attached Images
    Last edited by Disturbed1; 06-22-2020 at 03:36 PM.

  4. #4
    Senior Member 34nineteen's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Disturbed1 View Post
    I have ordered Nissin components for several bikes over the years. Typically they only have three varriant colors. I don't know if it was a production thing, or they gave me a OE bike spec'd one off of a currnet production run, but one time when I ordered Black they sent me one similar to the color of the one on the right.

    Anyone know why the inlet is different?

    They both look to be Radial Types, just the one having the reservoir coming out the side is a newer version.
    (One on Right or lighter color. Which is all they manufacture now in a Radial.)

    "The vertically angled body lets the lever flow fluid directly through the master cylinder giving it a sharper response."

    At least that is what Nissin says in it's brochure... Follow the link to the two different styles.

    For refference.

    https://www.shindypro.com/brake_mckits.html
    One is radial, one is axial. I prefer the feel of an axial m/c over a radial one in most cases.

  5. #5
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    I went from the 5/8 axial to the 3/4 radial on the ztl2. Mind blowing

  6. #6
    Senior Member Cooter's Avatar
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    Thanks so much for the awesome info! Ya they are both 19mm (3/4") Radial M/c's identical except for where the reservoir feeds the masters piston, and the RX/SX difference explains the fluid reservoir bracket confusion I was having (Thank you Barrett).

    Hey Disturbed, where ya been man? I doubt I'm fast enough to feel the difference in the side inlet like their brochure says, it is a little more of a PITA to bleed. Everything was dry on install and my levers are pretty far rolled forward though, I normally loosen them and level the master out to bleed them.

    BUT, like Mike Looowwraay said, swapping to the radial M/c (even the same size) was a bigger difference that I thought too, hence the change over. I couldn't even get my bike to stop with a ZTL-2 and a 5/8" master!

    34:19, what makes you like the axial system better? It is a cleaner look for sure, but that would be an anomaly

  7. #7
    Senior Member Cooter's Avatar
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    And why the heck is such a simple part so much dang money if you go shopping at Brembo?!

    I would call total BS, but I learned an important lesson about that with the Oberon Slave. Simply a better machined part at the same dimension made the clutch pull HALF of what it was

  8. #8
    Senior Member Disturbed1's Avatar
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    Hey Disturbed, where ya been man?
    Hey Cooter, Just lurking around... Only dispensing info if I have something relevant to say.

    I will say this… Your pic’s confused me because I thought the left one was an axial at first. But after looking at the orientation from a handlebar perspective. I knew they were both radials. (Rod / Plunger Parallel to bar = Axial, Rod / Plunger Perpendicular to bar = Radial.) You got to get a better photographer man... maybe that special someone you use at glamor shots…

    I doubt I'm fast enough to feel the difference in the side inlet like their brochure says, it is a little more of a PITA to bleed
    Yeah, I know about the bleeding of the system. I have the old radial version, easy. New radial version, PIA. Truth be told, with a grain of salt, my peeps told me that they changed the design because of a flood of Chinese knock-offs. That, and looking more like Brembo's, not for actual performance.

    And for clarification purposes, I am only talking about actual Nissin brake master cylinders. Not an OE bike manufacture that has sourced Nissin to manufacture there braking components to meet their design specifications and fitment.

    I normally loosen them and level the master out to bleed them.
    I usually bleed somewhat backwards. Have an empty reservoir (1 quart clear jug.) higher than the bikes handlebars coming from it with a hose attached to the Brake Caliper Bleeder. (Clear hose filled completely with brake fluid with no air.) Then crack the brake caliper bleeder and pump the brake lever while adding fluid to the master cylinder reservoir . (Yes some will drip around the bleeder, so get a rag.) Every time the master cylinder lever is pumped it will add fluid to the brake system. And because the brake caliper has a hose with brake fluid attached to, it cannot draw air back into the system when you release the brake master cylinder lever. If you use a clear hose on the brake caliper bleeder, you can watch your entire brake system flush out the old fluid up to the 1 quart jug.

    I can bleed the entire brake system in about 5 minutes with fresh fluid, and it works very well with the Buell / EBR mono-block brake caliper.
    Last edited by Disturbed1; 06-23-2020 at 05:47 AM.

  9. #9
    Senior Member Cooter's Avatar
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    Ya know BuellXB sideways pic fun! LOL

    Ya, I have spent too much $$ for an "Ohlins" steering damper before that was definitley NOT. Sucks to be suckered

    Good idea on the bleed, I'll try that So funny how the simplest system (car vs bike) can be the toughest to bleed! I'm normally gravity bleed-then-vacuum guy so I'm used to putting teflon tape on the bleeder screw threads, carefully avoiding the hole. I am surprised Erik didn't put another bleed on the inside side of the caliper. Once the dry system is fully bled it's an easy process to even swap fluid once a year, but man, that first time can be a bear!

    Thanks for the help

  10. #10
    Senior Member Disturbed1's Avatar
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    Once the dry system is fully bled it's an easy process to even swap fluid once a year
    You hit that nail right on the head...

    Possibly the best thing to do for a Buell or EBR is change the fluid early and often. These single large block brake calipers wreak havoc with the brake fluid. (It is why they put the air scoop on the EBRs.) There is just no place for the heat to go with all of the mass involved. (Between the large thick rotor and single brake caliper.) I have systematically changed and modified different components on the front braking system, but the biggest improvement is to always change the fluid...

    Since you brought up Brembo's. Have you ever tried their brake fluid? I can say, even in a non-Brembo system that stuff is good. I was at the track and getting a lot of fade in my zuk, and the guy in the paddock next to me said try the Brembo fluid. I shrugged my shoulders, but he gave me some and it was like night and day. I don't know what those Italians put in that stuff. Maybe it’s the olive oil they put on everything.

    Good Luck my friend with your braking needs…


    Last edited by Disturbed1; 06-23-2020 at 02:03 PM.

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