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Thread: RH scoop info

  1. #1
    Senior Member 34nineteen's Avatar
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    RH scoop info

    I dont know about you, but I consider one mandatory for the bike in Phoenix, AZ. This article tends to call it out as a placebo.


    From the Fall 2007 Fuell Online Magazine:

    Q. Abe, what can you tell us about the "right side air scoop" on the XBs? I've seen people fit larger ones (near mirror images of the left side) in an attempt to increase the cooling capacity. It seems the smaller one will allow for an increased air velocity and potentially more cooling. What's the deal?

    A. The intent of the right side air scoop is to get better airflow over the fule rail when the fan is on (at low speed). Getting proper airflow to the fuel rail is important in order to prevent vapor-lock during extended idle or parade duty in hot ambient temperatures. It turns out that if this scoop has too big of an opening, the airflow is not directed to the fuel rail as effectively. In our testing, a right side air scoop created as a mirror image of the left hurt fuel rail temperatures at idle.

    The left side air scoop was shaped to direct air to the rear cylinder and is very effective at doing that. During our high-speed, hot-ambient testing, the front and rear spark-plug base temperatures are virtually identical, whereas on the old tube-twin bikes there was a 100 Degree Fahrenheit difference (rear running hotter).


    Supposedly it was in the "Ask Abe" section of Fuell®, Fall 2007. As explained by Abe Askenazi - Director of Analysis, Test, and Engineering Process at Buell.

    (I'm just cutting and pasting it from an old thread on here).

  2. #2
    Senior Member Endopotential's Avatar
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    That's an interesting comment. Has anyone ever had fuel vapor lock issues at heat?

    My OCD is just upset that it's so hard to find a RSS that matches the left. The Pegasus ones are expensive and super hard to find.

  3. #3
    Senior Member 34nineteen's Avatar
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    I've never experienced it. The asymmetrical look of the two scoops used to bother me, but now I kind of like it.


    This oughta bake your cookies... Did you know that the center bump on a factory Lightning flyscreen is not in the center. Its a little offset to the side.

    The aftermarket one have the bump directly down the middle, and it doesnt line up with the gauges correctly.


    Look closely... and now you can't unsee it.

    38FC857F-D1FD-46EB-B9E7-06AE83DF7F4B.jpg

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    What are the symptoms of this “vapor lock”

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    Senior Member Endopotential's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by 34nineteen View Post
    This oughta bake your cookies... Did you know that the center bump on a factory Lightning flyscreen is not in the center. Its a little offset to the side.
    Look closely... and now you can't unsee it.
    AAARRRGGGGHHH!!!! Now you did it! I can never look at my Buell again!!!

  6. #6
    Senior Member 34nineteen's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mike lowary View Post
    What are the symptoms of this “vapor lock”
    You have to ask one of the guys who wears a T-shirt with a front pocket aka Cooter.

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    Senior Member 34nineteen's Avatar
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    On the tubers, the Lightning’s have asymmetrical flyscreen also. By the X1 and S1 have the raised portion on opposite sides.

    Also, Erik Buell eats candy bars with a fork and knife.









    (I figured some fake trivia would be fun)

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    Usually after you take a ride and stop for a short period of time the heat makes a gas vapor bubble which prevents the fluid gasoline from passing it and the bike ends up sputtering and won't quite kick over, after it cools down a little it usually starts right up.

    Since the Ully was rear ended and laid up while I'm trying to get parts for it, I decided to take the right side air scoop off of it and install it on the SS, what a difference, it was easily noticeable, the fan hardly ever came on after the install, I would highly recommend the right side air scoop or better yet the entire comfort package.
    Last edited by njloco; 10-15-2020 at 03:12 AM.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by mike lowary View Post
    What are the symptoms of this “vapor lock”
    Engine won't run or won't start. Best case scenario, it'll run really rough. This was common on older cars with mechanical fuel pumps. When the pump would get hot from high rpm running (racing, etc) the heat would transfer into the fuel. If the fuel was running at a higher rate (engine rpms higher), it'd be "fine". But, when the engine was shut off, the heat would soak into to the fuel line, and the fuel would "vaporize" and cause a bubble that would prevent the engine from starting again. Short and not totally accurate answer but I think it should suffice.

    If you're wanting to geek out on it: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vapor_lock
    Last edited by kz6fittycent; 10-15-2020 at 02:21 PM.

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    Quote Originally Posted by 34nineteen View Post
    I dont know about you, but I consider one mandatory for the bike in Phoenix, AZ. This article tends to call it out as a placebo.


    From the Fall 2007 Fuell Online Magazine:

    Q. Abe, what can you tell us about the "right side air scoop" on the XBs? I've seen people fit larger ones (near mirror images of the left side) in an attempt to increase the cooling capacity. It seems the smaller one will allow for an increased air velocity and potentially more cooling. What's the deal?

    A. The intent of the right side air scoop is to get better airflow over the fule rail when the fan is on (at low speed). Getting proper airflow to the fuel rail is important in order to prevent vapor-lock during extended idle or parade duty in hot ambient temperatures. It turns out that if this scoop has too big of an opening, the airflow is not directed to the fuel rail as effectively. In our testing, a right side air scoop created as a mirror image of the left hurt fuel rail temperatures at idle.

    The left side air scoop was shaped to direct air to the rear cylinder and is very effective at doing that. During our high-speed, hot-ambient testing, the front and rear spark-plug base temperatures are virtually identical, whereas on the old tube-twin bikes there was a 100 Degree Fahrenheit difference (rear running hotter).


    Supposedly it was in the "Ask Abe" section of Fuell®, Fall 2007. As explained by Abe Askenazi - Director of Analysis, Test, and Engineering Process at Buell.

    (I'm just cutting and pasting it from an old thread on here).
    Man, I was trying to save up for a carbon fiber right side scoop to match the one I have on the left side. This made me question that choice. That said, my rides don't include much (if any) extended idle time and definitely not parading. It gets really hot in TX and I "believe" the rear cylinder would benefit from a larger r. side scoop. I've been moving along at 45 mph and can hear the cooling fan running non-stop on really hot days.



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