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Thread: 'Melvins'

  1. #11
    Senior Member Barrett's Avatar
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    These D-bags should just end this charade and get into the ultra-high-end scope business. Adding Tenderloin!



  2. #12
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    I really want that cobra scope

  3. #13
    Senior Member Cooter's Avatar
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    Six people. Thats the answer I wanted. It looks like a whole SIX people have the courage to plunk down a whole $25 to reserve a "Brand New" Hammerhead

    But you do get a free hat! Hmmm, might be worth that.

  4. #14
    Senior Member Mesozoic's Avatar
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    Cool Bloody engineers

    I have no idea who Bill Melvin is, but I get your disdain towards several individuals mentioned in previous posts, including the Stark fella. But something you mentioned about engineered designs being outdated by time, I wanted to comment on that. In some design projects the ultimate goal is to have optimized the design for a specific application. This is particularly true for airframe design, kinetic projectiles including bullets and in many cases, reciprocating engine design. Take for example the F-16 airframe that was originally developed by General Dynamics. The fuselage and overall airframe was designed using modern design techniques, including wind tunnel analysis, computational fluid dynamic analysis and many more design capabilities that were becoming available with the advent of computer aided design back in the early 1970s. The Fairchild A-10 "Warthog" is another good example of something that was designed in the 1960s and continues to evolve in relatively minor ways because the original design work was an epic undertaking that cost millions and millions of dollars. The design techniques have not changed as we can call airframe design, regardless of the application today, a "solved problem." In other words, there is no reason to reinvent the wheel. One of the key pieces of technology that has kept these old aircraft relevant in today's world is the avionics. We've got relative supercomputers onboard these aircraft that allow them to continue flying with one or more wings blown completely off the airframe because of the computational power and capability that supports a wide performance and stability envelope. For the intended application, these aircraft are pretty damn optimal and there is, from an operational requirements and engineered optimization perspective, little to nothing to gain in analyzing (read double checking or second guessing) the airframe design today.

    The same is true for many highly engineered rounds found in our favorite plinkers, including the .357 Magnum, .45 ACP, 300 Winchester, and countless more. All designed for a specific purpose and little gain to be had by reinvigorating an investigation into the original design. And finally, there's a couple of engines out there that have been designed from the ground up and optimized for a specific application, like Harley-Davidson's Evolution engine in the Sportster and our XBs, the small block Ford V8 series based on the Windsor engine design and countless others, including many highly durable diesel engines. The point I'm making is that just because the Helicon design is "old" doesn't mean that it's really outdated. Sure, there's been advances in direct injection technology that yields ungodly power increases without increasing displacement, there's been a few advances in materials science where modern coatings and more exotic materials could benefit power and durability, but at some point the plug has to be pulled in order to keep a project within budget too. BRP Rotax is one hell of an engineering design firm making some of the most durable and low maintenance engines in arguably the most stringent of industrial applications, aviation. They have a pedigree that dates back several generations that has garnered them one hell of a reputation - that they worked with Eric Buell to design the Helicon engine is something that any Buell motorcycle owner should be proud of as there is a legacy of engineering innovation and design expertise that's not taught in even the best of engineering schools embued in that lump.

    Something similar can be said for the Evolution engine design too. I found this British article that I thought was fairly interesting and probably written by someone with an engineering background - it gave me some renewed appreciation for the engine in my XB12. https://www.classicbikehub.uk/Featur...#39;%20-engine

  5. #15
    Senior Member 34nineteen's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mesozoic View Post
    I have no idea who Bill Melvin is,
    I'm looking forward to your next posting.... "I've have no idea who that Elon Musk guy is, but here is what is wrong with Tesla, and how other companies do it better."

  6. #16
    Senior Member Cooter's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mesozoic View Post
    I have no idea who Bill Melvin is...
    He doesn't matter. He's not an engineer. And neither is their "lead engineer", lol.

    But you miss the point. Imagine your A-10 Warthog example that was built in the 60's and the 'same one' today. To an outsider they look the same, they fly the same, they make wonderful brapping noises. BUT it's the differences in materials, construction, and electronics make it a completely different beast and incomparable to the first one built.

    How about the .44 mag in Wyatt Earps Peacemaker vs 'the same' .44 mag made today? The engineers at any ammunition supplier would disagree that they are 'the same'

    A 1955 Small block Chevy vs LS? Or how about just the first 1997 LS vs a new one? 95% swappable parts, but by FAR not the same engine today 'Vette to 'Vette.

    The difference in the 2014 and 2022 V-2 Panigale the EBR was built to complete against is massive. Ya, it looks the same, it rides the same, but the decade of learning applied to the electronics that control it make it a totally different beast.
    The difference in a 2014 EBR and a "New Buell" today is ZERO. Nothing. They haven't even addressed the common faults (evap solid, chassis brace) since 2016.

    "Engineering" today includes electronics. In materials, construction, assembly, application, and THAT is todays difference. The new Buell is a ghost from the past. A 1955 Corvette with a SBC isn't any slower than it used to be, but it doesn't compare to the same 2022 one. 4 wheels 2 doors, and a NA V-8 don't tell the whole story.

  7. #17
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    Maybe if Tony Stark made the power plant and upgraded the electronics I would write a check.

    Add his riding gear and we would never fear that hairpin again.

  8. #18
    Senior Member 34nineteen's Avatar
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    Maybe Buells new direction isnt to manufacture a bleeding edge technology bike? Maybe its just building American made bikes that are "good enough". Nothing wrong with that.

    I applaud Bill Melvin for stepping up, investing in the company and trying to turn it around. I'm curious to see what the future brings and the future lineup.

  9. #19
    Senior Member 34nineteen's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by cvc View Post
    Maybe if Tony Stark made the power plant and upgraded the electronics I would write a check.

    Add his riding gear and we would never fear that hairpin again.
    As soon as you get done with those front isolators, hop to it on the Tony Stark power plant (TSPP).

  10. #20
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    Pretty sure Wyatt Earp shot a single action colt calibered in 45Long Colt



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