Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 11 to 16 of 16

Thread: 'Full Floater' rotor setup

  1. #11
    Senior Member Kurlon's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2023
    Location
    Southern Maine
    Posts
    194
    The advantages of going R6 front end, any suspension shop worth anything knows them blindfolded, massive aftermarket for them, OEM bits are still readily available and in production. Parts for them are everywhere, wheels, rotors, internals, super easy to repair/etc from parts trackside due to them being so abundant. Additionally, with a tweaked fender mount setup you can quick change the front wheel without undoing the calipers at all, which is particularly handy when you're a one man team in the pits.

    Now, that said, I do want to give the OEM setup a fighting chance, compared to most bikes I've jumped on it doesn't feel crazily undersprung up front though I likely will need a higher rate set of springs. I'm not making any judgements on damping at the moment 'cause 15yr old oil, 24kmi on the bushings, I don't think either end has been serviced so not fair to say the perf is lacking yet. I've also only lightly played on the road, will need to get on a track to really get a feel for things.

    I have pulled the rotor (EBC, not OEM) and hardware, and cleaned with scotchbrite and brake clean. I've got new pads on the way, will tear it down again and this time the caliper will come apart and get a dip in the ultrasonic while I'm doing things.

    As far as competitiveness, remember I'm going up against Sportster XR1200s, etc, so everything is relative. I'm going to be down on power compared to the Hammer 1275 kitted machines to start, but chasing power will be a winter project.

  2. #12
    Senior Member Cooter's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Location
    Crawling up your skirt
    Posts
    10,907
    It's obvious you know what you're doing and have enough experience to get on track safe/fun/cheap. Are the grids for "Air-cooled American" very big on the East Coast?

    Ya, you'll pay for the few specialty parts you need to make the OE system viable today. I have OE rotors, all the way to a spare EBR race set-up, I could even source a chain swingarm but it's all expensive because of the rarity IMO, get out there and use what ya got for a few races, then you can decide what direction to spend your money on.

    Converting a stock tensioner to chain is easy and super cheap. I never had an issue with durability once I added a set screw to the slot.

  3. #13
    Senior Member Kurlon's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2023
    Location
    Southern Maine
    Posts
    194
    I've only raced LRRS/NEMRR at NHMS with any regularity, so my view of grids is pretty localized, at the moment there are only two riders I'm aware of playing this game under NEMRR rules. One's on an XB, the other has a tube frame Buell and a 1200 XR they seat bounce between. Even back in 2008 there weren't many doing it. I'm hoping with the subclass in Super Hooligan we see a resurgence, though with HD ending production of the engine, it's going to make that difficult.

  4. #14
    Senior Member 34nineteen's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Location
    Kolache Factory
    Posts
    4,432
    Quote Originally Posted by Kurlon View Post
    The advantages of going R6 front end, any suspension shop worth anything knows them blindfolded, massive aftermarket for them, OEM bits are still readily available and in production. Parts for them are everywhere, wheels, rotors, internals, super easy to repair/etc from parts trackside due to them being so abundant. Additionally, with a tweaked fender mount setup you can quick change the front wheel without undoing the calipers at all, which is particularly handy when you're a one man team in the pits.

    Now, that said, I do want to give the OEM setup a fighting chance, compared to most bikes I've jumped on it doesn't feel crazily undersprung up front though I likely will need a higher rate set of springs. I'm not making any judgements on damping at the moment 'cause 15yr old oil, 24kmi on the bushings, I don't think either end has been serviced so not fair to say the perf is lacking yet. I've also only lightly played on the road, will need to get on a track to really get a feel for things.

    I have pulled the rotor (EBC, not OEM) and hardware, and cleaned with scotchbrite and brake clean. I've got new pads on the way, will tear it down again and this time the caliper will come apart and get a dip in the ultrasonic while I'm doing things.

    As far as competitiveness, remember I'm going up against Sportster XR1200s, etc, so everything is relative. I'm going to be down on power compared to the Hammer 1275 kitted machines to start, but chasing power will be a winter project.
    Good points.

    On the caliper, you can remove the pistons for cleaning while leaving the assembly together. At one time I made some wooden blocks to hold the other pistons in place while I used air pressure to blow each one out individually, and manually clean the pistons and seals with a clean rag dipped in brake fluid. I've had great results doing this as most of my Buells have had sticky pistons in the front caliper.

    I found that to work much better than the ultrasonic cleaner.

    I'm assuming your bike has the 6 piston setup?


    Concerning the 1275 kits, I've not noticed much difference using them in a Buell application. IIRC the 1275's have a little bit more compression than the stock XB pistons, so aside from that and the small displacement bump, I've not noticed much difference. I'd imagine the same for the XR1200 also.

    On my 2016 XL1200CX, I did a 1250 kit with cams. The 1250 kit made a little bit of difference, whereas the cams made a lot more power than the stock W cams that came with the Sportster.

    Keep us posted, this thread is very entertaining.

    For now, I need to go heckle a forum member who is trying to sell his moms car on IG.
    Last edited by 34nineteen; 07-07-2023 at 07:21 PM.

  5. #15
    Senior Member 34nineteen's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Location
    Kolache Factory
    Posts
    4,432
    Quote Originally Posted by Cooter View Post
    It's obvious you know what you're doing and have enough experience to get on track safe/fun/cheap. Are the grids for "Air-cooled American" very big on the East Coast?

    Ya, you'll pay for the few specialty parts you need to make the OE system viable today. I have OE rotors, all the way to a spare EBR race set-up, I could even source a chain swingarm but it's all expensive because of the rarity IMO, get out there and use what ya got for a few races, then you can decide what direction to spend your money on.

    Converting a stock tensioner to chain is easy and super cheap. I never had an issue with durability once I added a set screw to the slot.


    You're a set screw.

  6. #16
    Senior Member outthere's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2018
    Posts
    657
    I can see Buell running circles around an XR1200. I've seen a few wadded up with hotdogs at the controls. No ground clearance.


    Last edited by outthere; 07-08-2023 at 01:54 AM.

Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •